Windows Defender Browser Protection for Google Chrome

Posted in Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7 by Steve Sinchak

Microsoft Edge on Windows 10 includes the Windows Defender SmartScreen service for years that prevents users from accidentally browsing to known malicious and fake phishing websites. While Microsoft Edge is a great browser and has many very strong security features, Microsoft understands that many people choose to use Google Chrome.  As such, Microsoft still cares about the security of the web browser that you use because after all, the web browser remains to be the number one attack vector to infect your PC.  To help Google Chrome protect your PC, Microsoft has released the Windows Defender Browser Protection extension for Google Chrome. 

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Exploring the new Activity Timeline in Windows 10

Posted in Windows 10 by Steve Sinchak

In the Windows 10 Spring Creators Update, Microsoft completely revamped the window switching button on the taskbar known as task view. Previously the button when activated would display a thumbnail of each application and window open on your PC. Now the feature takes it to the next level and lets you go back in time. That’s right, it’s a time machine for your apps. 

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Managing your Privacy in Windows 10

Posted in Windows 10 by Steve Sinchak

Windows 10 is a true cloud-based operating system that includes both cloud and local elements designed to provide an experience that seamlessly roams across devices and automates the manual tasks of keeping Windows up-to-date and your PC protected. We expect our operating systems to be reliable and perform well at all times but problems do happen. Windows 10 is smart enough to detect and report them to Microsoft so Windows 10 can be improved, but this capability along with many other elements of Windows 10 can impact your privacy. In this article, I will review the privacy features in Windows 10 to help you find the right balance.

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The Ultimate Windows 10 Gaming PC

Posted in Windows 10 by Steve Sinchak

Over the past few years, I was determined to build the ultimate Windows 10 Gaming PC that was not only small but also very powerful as I didn't want a noisy monstrosity on my desk that was primarily used for work. After doing more research on the latest hardware available, it became clear that if I wanted top performance, I had to give up my tiny form factors.  And so it is time for my annual "ultimate pc" tradition, and this time I'm going big.

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Converting your PC from Legacy BIOS to UEFI

Posted in Windows 10 by Steve Sinchak

There are many reasons to convert your computer from the traditional BIOS to the newer UEFI standard if your hardware supports it.  You will notice slightly faster power on times and support for new security capabilities such as Secure Boot, Credential Guard, and Device Guard when using UEFI. Traditionally the only way to switch from BIOS to UEFI required a complete rebuild of your PC. But with the Windows 10 Creator Update or newer, there is a useful command line utility that will save you a ton of time. 

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Control when your PC Updates with Active Hours in Windows 10

Posted in Windows 10 by Steve Sinchak

Have you ever experience forced reboots in the middle of the workday? Windows needs to keep itself up to date to protect you and your data from the latest security threats, but there is an easy way to accomplish this without annoying downtime while your computer reboots to apply updates. The Active Hours feature in Windows 10 works like a do not disturb sign.  When it is active, Windows Update will not forcefully reboot your computer allowing you to focus on what matters most to you. 

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Introduction to Windows AutoPilot

Posted in Windows 10 by Steve Sinchak

Traditional IT deployment of Windows PCs requires the creation of a customized image for every device model, and then additional configuration with things called task sequences found in products such as System Center Configuration Manager.  Once this is completed, the PC can finally be built a number of ways but it requires something to typically be done to the machine to kick off the build.  This may be as simple as installing an SCCM client on it or sticking in a USB boot drive to kick off the build.  But there are many problems associated with this process.

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